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Experimental Force Feedback Hand Contoller

Authors: [tex2html_wrap4380]F. Reynier, X. Chen, V. Hayward

Investigator username: hayward

Category: robotics

Subcategory: telerobotics

We have constructed a 6 axis tendon-driven high-fidelity force reflecting hand controller for use as a reference stimulator (with isotropic dynamic response) to evaluate human acuity to various motion stimuli in terms of wave form, amplitude and direction, see Figure 33. Some results have been obtained in terms of the human ability to distinguish and determine the nature of small amplitude motions sensed through the finger tips.

cliquesptitle A Six DOF Haptic Interface Authors: [tex2html_wrap4382]V. Hayward, X. Chen, F. Reynier, O. Astley

Investigator username: hayward

Category: robotics

Subcategory: telerobotics

A six DOF haptic interface has been designed and a prototype implemented. The integrated approach which has been followed solves several problems in terms of precision, cost and complexity. The technical choices have been driven by cost considerations without compromising performance. The device is intented to be operated with a multi-digit precision grasp (like a pen) which makes it suitable for a large number of applications. It is electrically actuated, all the motors are grounded, and motion is transmitted by stiff polymeric tendons. Position and force is sensed via optical transducers that we developed and integrated into the design. See Figure 34

cliquesptitle A Two DOF Planar Haptic Interface: The Pantograph Authors: [tex2html_wrap4384]V. Hayward, C. Ramstein (CiTi), J. Choksi, G. Lanvin, E. Bonneton, A. Topper (Robosoft Corp.)

Investigator username: hayward

Category: robotics

Subcategory: telerobotics

We have designed a desktop haptic interface (a programmable force feed-back mouse so-to-speak). Several prototypes have been constructed to date. Prominent features of this device include a large workspace, low friction, low inertia, high rigidity and a minimal intrusion in the work area. Programmed mechanical models are used to kinesthetically describe the features of an interface. These models are analogous to iconic representations in conventional graphic interfaces. Users, acting and perceiving through the haptic channel, simultaneously perceive simulated objects through the visual and auditory channels, see Figure 35.

cliquesptitle Remotely Operated Underwater Vehicle (ROV's) and Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUV's) Authors: [tex2html_wrap4386]G. Dudek, V. Hayward, M.D. Levine, E. Papadopoulos, S. Shah

Investigator username: hayward

Category: robotics

Subcategory: telerobotics

A Remotely Operated Underwater Vehicle (ROV) is basically a free-swimming vehicle which carries one primary video camera and other sensors to provide feedback of the vehicle's environment to a remote pilot. A tether cable is used to transmit power to the vehicle and serve as a medium through which the video signal and other sensor data are transmitted to the surface.

Untethered ROV's, more generally called Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUV's), dispense with the tether cable and carry their own power. Because of the drastically reduced bandwidth and considerable transmission delays inherent in tetherless underwater communications, these vehicles must have greater on-board intelligence and autonomy.

This project has surveyed the current state of ROV and AUV technology and current areas of research in order to evaluate the future role in this field of the Centre for Intelligent Machines. Many opportunities and technical challenges present themselves in developing low cost ROV's and more sophisticated, semi-autonomous ROV/AUV vehicles.

REPORTS: 1. G. Dudek, V. Hayward, M.D. Levine, E. Papadopoulos and S. Shah, ``Low Cost Remotely Operated Underwater Vehicles'', Jan 1994, internal document.



Next: Virtual Laboratory Up: Space Robotics Previous: Autonomous Dynamical Manipulation


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